in

Former co-founder of Facebook Chris Hughes meets with FTC for a monopoly investigation against Facebook

Former co-founder of Facebook Chris Hughes meets with FTC for a monopoly investigation against Facebook

Chris Hughes, co-founder of Facebook, has come up with his long-term critical statements about the social network and exchanges views with US legislators about breaking up Facebook.

As you know, the US Senate has been talking about taking steps against the monopolization of technology giants such as Facebook, Google and Amazon for a while. The first step taken last month when the FTC launched an anti-trust investigation against Facebook was followed by the Ministry of Justice filing a new lawsuit against the company for anti-trust surveillance.

Hughes, who left the company in 2007, met with the Federal Trade Commission and a number of state prosecutors along with two leading anti-trust defenders Tim Wu and Scott Hemphill.

Looking at Hughes's presentation, we can say that Facebook's former co-founder has adopted an antitrust approach to “defensive serial acquisitions”.

According to this approach, Facebook acquired competing companies to eliminate competitive threats. Thus, it strengthened its position in the advertising industry and was able to charge more advertisers.

The meeting between Hughes and the FTC came up after Facebook released its second quarter earnings report. A spokesman authorized by Hughes refused to comment, while the FTC, the Ministry of Justice, Wu and Hemphill remain silent.

In the meantime, it is worth recalling Hughes' views on Facebook. In an interview in May of this year, Hughes said Facebook had become the largest of its kind without restricting entrepreneurship and restricting consumer choices. Hughes he also stated that the purchase of WhatsApp and Instagram should not happen and should be compensated.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Habbo Tricks

Google Cloud & # 039; annual revenue up to $ 8 billion

Google Cloud & # 039; annual revenue up to $ 8 billion