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Why the Galaxy S10 Night mode is best used for ultra-wide photos

Why the Galaxy S10 Night mode is best used for ultra-wide photos

The dedicated night mode Samsung Galaxy S10e, Galaxy S10, and Galaxy S10 + camera is quite impressive, as we found out when we first tested it, and recently, I've come to realize that night mode is best used for taking ultra -wide photos at night. The primary camera does not have nearly enough trouble at night as the ultra-wide lens.

Ultra-wide camera is more limited in low-light conditions

That's because the primary camera has an aperture of F1.5, the ultra-wide lens has an aperture of F2.2. In layman terms, the aperture is through the lens, and a lower aperture number is equal to a lens opening. A higher aperture value – F2.2 in the case of the Galaxy S10's ultra-wide camera – means you get a smaller opening, so less light can get in.

And that means there's a lot of noise in the night time. Ultra-wide pictures taken in the night mode. That's why I've started using Night mode for almost all ultra-wide pictures. Night mode does not completely fix the noise in ultra-wide pictures (thanks to the F2.2 aperture), but it does not increase significantly, either, but I still think the pictures are getting better and better ,

Check out two different scenes captured with the ultra-wide camera in automatic and night mode below (swipe left for the night mode image). They are not the best examples of the sake of comparison, so I've added a gallery of two ultra-wide night mode pictures.

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Night mode photos too bright? There's a solution for that

While Night mode photos are usually quite useful, they can sometimes be too bright, but there's a solution to that: you just have to reduce the exposure of the scene before you hit the shutter button. You can do that on the screen when you tap on any part of the scene in the viewfinder – here's a GIF in case you do not know what I'm talking about.

Below are the same two scenes that I got after:

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By reducing exposure, you're basically telling us to take a picture. It's useful when you're in the middle of a scene and it's not working, and it's something you can use for it.

The very purpose of Night mode. You can experiment with the best of a night scene. And yes, you can manually increase Exposure as well when the occasion calls for it, although I've never felt the need for that for ultra-wide night mode pictures.


How often do you use Night mode when taking pictures with your Galaxy S10? Do you both use it for regular and ultra-wide pictures or just one of the two in most instances? Let me know in the comments!

  • model SM-G970F
  • Dimensions: 69.9 x 142.2 x 7.9mm
  • display: 5.8 “(146.5mm) Super AMOLED
  • CPU: Exynos 9820 Octa
  • Camera: 12 MP, CMOS F1.5 / F2.4 (77 °) & 16MP, CMOS F2.2 (123 °) Ultra Wide

The post Why the Galaxy S10 Night mode was first used on SamMobile.

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